How much is jaw surgery with insurance?

Does insurance cover jaw surgery?

Orthognathic surgery is often covered by insurance if a functional problem can be documented, assuming there are no exclusions for jaw surgery on your insurance plan. A surgeon’s cost for jaw surgery may vary based on his or her experience, the type of procedure used, as well as geographic office location.

How much does it cost for jaw surgery?

Without insurance, the typical costs of jaw surgery to correct an underbite can run from $20,000 to $40,000. Costs are usually lower if surgery is only needed on one jaw. Surgery involves an exam, X-rays, general anesthesia, bone cutting, bone reshaping, and jaw repositioning.

How much does jaw surgery cost out of pocket?

The cost of jaw surgery typically ranges between $20,000-$40,000. However, surgery to correct temporomandibular joint dysfunction can cost up to $50,000.

Is corrective jaw surgery worth it?

However, while the thought of invasive procedures and having corrective or cosmetic jaw surgery is both intimidating and time-consuming, most patients feel the benefits of orthognathic surgery are life-changing and well worth the time and effort.

How painful is jaw surgery recovery?

Pain and swelling are not uncommon after jaw surgery, and the severity coincides with the extensiveness of your surgical procedure. Minor pain is often well managed with over the counter pain medications. However, we will prescribe you stronger pain medication should your pain be more severe.

How long does jaw surgery take to heal?

Initial jaw healing typically takes about six weeks after surgery, but complete healing can take up to 12 weeks. After initial jaw healing — at about six weeks — your orthodontist finishes aligning your teeth with braces. The entire orthodontic process, including surgery and braces, may take several years.

Is jaw surgery painful?

Jaw surgery is usually performed after the growth stops, which is around ages 14 to 16 years for females and 17 to 21 years for males. The surgery is performed under general anesthesia, so there is no pain during surgery. Patients usually experience pain after the anesthesia wears off, which can last for a few days.

How do you know if you need jaw surgery?

You have trouble biting, chewing, or swallowing. Jaw growth sometimes occurs at differing rates for the upper and lower jaws, resulting in misaligned jaws that make eating difficult. If you have trouble biting, chewing, or swallowing, you may need orthognathic surgery.

How can I reshape my jawline?

With your mouth closed, push your lower jaw out and lift your lower lip. You should feel a stretch build just under the chin and in the jawline. Hold the position for 10–15 seconds, then relax.

Do I need jaw surgery overbite?

You may need jaw surgery to alleviate severe underbites and overbites. If either the top or bottom jaw grows faster or more than the other jaw, you may end up with an overbite or an underbite. An overbite occurs when the top jaw and teeth protrude over the bottom.

Can you finance jaw surgery?

If patients do not have the option to pay for orthognathic surgery using their insurance or a flexible spending account (FSA), they often turn to dental health financing. These monthly payment plans are like traditional loans or credit cards.

Who qualifies for jaw surgery?

Some cases that require corrective jaw surgery are: You have a receding chin. You have suffered from a facial injury or have birth defects that have misaligned your jaw. You have an overextended jaw.

Is jaw surgery considered major surgery?

Although it is considered safe for good candidates, it is a serious surgical procedure that requires general anesthesia, a 3-4 day hospital stay, and typically takes up to 3 months to recover from.

Can jaw surgery make you look worse?

Jaw surgery to correct an over-bite is often undergone to correct a “gummy smile.” The corrective surgery for this moves the jaw backwards and significantly alters the appearance of the chin, giving it a stronger, more pronounced look on the face.

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